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Pink Ribbon Germany wants to increase awareness for breast cancer, and to get more women to start checking their breasts regularly. Self-checking doesn’t prevent breast cancer, but it makes you more sensible to your own body, so that changes in your breasts can be detected earlier. When you notice anything unusual, talk to your gynaecologist.

This video shows you how to check your breasts.

Facts about breast cancer:

Young women can also be affected.

Breast cancer concerns all women. In western countries, breast cancer is the most common and dangerous type of cancer. One in eight women will suffer from it during the course of their lives. Every year 70,000 new cases are reported in Germany alone. Younger women can be affected too. Spotting breast cancer early can play an essential role in the recovery process. Men of all ages can also get breast cancer, though it’s much less common.

Early detection puts the odds on your side.

Breast cancer is in most cases a highly curable disease if detected and treated early. When breast cancer is detected early, the five-year survival rate is 79 percent. The smaller the cancer tumour is when first detected the less likely it is to have spread, and therefore, it is generally easier to treat. Usually that also means that gentler therapeutic methods can be applied.

Why you should self-check regularly.

Most breast cancers are discovered when a woman suspects that something is wrong. That’s why it is important that you get to know your breasts and your body well. When you check your breasts regularly, you get a better understanding of what’s normal for you. Then, in case you would notice something unusual, go straight to your gynaecologist for a second opinion.

Now is the time to take action.
Here is your breast self-check tutorial.

Compare your breasts.

Stand in front of the mirror, and put your hands on your hips. Compare your breasts and look for changes in size, shape or position. Also pay attention to changes in your skin or nipples.

How do they move?

Raise both of your arms. Look from the front, and from the sides. Do your breasts follow the movements?

Look at your nipples.

Pay attention to your nipples. Are they turned in?

Pat your breasts.

Start patting your breasts, ideally while laying on your back. Stick one arm behind your head. Use your other hand to pat the breast on the opposite side. Pat systematically, with small circular movements. Start in the middle of your chest bone, and pat going up, then down, then up again, continuing across your breast. Also pat the area around the areola. Keep your hand flat, and pat with your fingertips.

Pat your armpits.

Also pat your armpits.

Squeeze your nipple.

Put your nipple between your thumb and index finger, and squeeze it. Make sure there isn’t any discharge.

Did you notice anything unusual?

Talk to your gynaecologist if you spot any changes. Ideally you should check your breasts once a month on a set day in the first week after your period.

Tutorial.

Pink Ribbon Germany wants to increase awareness for breast cancer, and to get more women to start checking their breasts regularly. Self-checking doesn’t prevent breast cancer, but it makes you more sensible to your own body, so that changes in your breasts can be detected earlier. When you notice anything unusual, talk to your gynaecologist.